Tagged: consultancy

Social media mentoring

What many organisations need is actually a hybrid between consultancy and training.  This is because they understand the need to assume a much greater responsibility for managing social media in-house and re-configuring their usage of agency services, but need guidance on how best to do this (guidance they are unlikely to get from their existing agencies).  In part this involves a process of education (or re-education), but also very practical implementation advice which they can call upon as and when they need it.

I call this social media mentoring – a process of guiding an organisation through a period of change.

I can be such a mentor, providing advice on how to implement social media as a business process and also how to understand the new trends and pressures that may start to affect a business as this thing called the social digital revolution starts to play out.

Implementation support

The training and workshop sessions that I provide are designed to help an organisation re-calibrate its thinking about social media and identify new opportunities.  Sometimes this can be enough of a catalyst to stimulate all the necessary actions, but often there is a need to add more fuel or direction to a process of change.  This can be in the form of detailed implementation advice, assisting in spreading knowledge further through an organisation or  curating an assessment process to check on progress, review ROI and objectives and generally keep the ship on-course.

I can provide this on an ad-hoc basis, or an organisation can buy a chunk of my time which it can then deploy as it sees fit.

Understanding the future

I dislike the term ‘futurology’ or ‘futurologist’.  None-the-less, we are now living in time where the future is not what it used to be.  This is a real problem because it means that businesses not only have to manage the day-to-day, they also have to keep a heads-up because there may be something around the corner that can either propel them to a new level of success, or put them out of business.

This creates something I call platform anxiety: it is a bit like being at a station, believing you need to go somewhere, but not knowing either where this is exactly or what platform the train is leaving from.  And also not being completely sure that you either need to take a train or even leave the city in the first place.  It is pretty stressful.

No-one can pretend to know the future, but one of the things I am very good at is getting beneath the ‘froth’ that can often accompany the latest big thing and identifying the important processes and trends that are driving what is going on.  This can help you make your own decisions about where you need to go and, crucially understand why you need to go there, so that you can work out the best way of doing this.

There are many ways I can do this for you: formal reports and analysis sessions, provocative and/or entertaining presentations at meetings, events or conferences, or in more informal discussions.